#Not1MoreEviction Day of Action at Senator Johnny Isakson’s office in Atlanta, Ga.

#Not1MoreEviction Day of Action at Senator Johnny Isakson’s office in Atlanta, Ga.

The Miseducation of Billy.

The Miseducation of Billy.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Veolia:  Hands Off the Boston School Bus Union 5! Stop the attacks on USW Local 8751!
How you can support the Boston School Bus Union 5:
1. Contact: 
Veolia General Manager Alex Roman III: 617-780-4840; alexander.roman@veoliatransdev.com
Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino: 617.635.4500, mayor@cityofboston.gov, Fax 617.635.2851
and John McDonough, Interim Superintendent of the Boston Public Schools 617-635-9050, superintendent@bostonpublicschools.org, fax 617-635-9059. 
Tell them “Honor the School Bus Drivers Contract! Hand off Local 8751 leaders!”
Send copies to the Committee to Defend the School Bus Union 5  at schoolbus5@teamsolidarity.org
2. Hold a solidarity activity, if possible at a Veolia location near you, or.
Come to Boston and Rally outside Veolia’s corporate offices during the disciplinary hearings against the 5!
 1:30pm – 8pm (Come after work!), Monday, October 28, 35 Freeport Way, Dorchester
3. Send solidarity letters and resolutions to the Committee to Defend the School Bus Union 5 at schoolbus5@teamsolidarity.org
4. Send your endorsement of the Committee to Defend the School Bus Union 5 to schoolbus5@teamsolidarity.org..
5.  Donate to the support fund. (account being set up.. find Team Solidarity on facebook at tinyurl.com/d5tntcg for more info)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Veolia:  Hands Off the Boston School Bus Union 5! Stop the attacks on USW Local 8751!

How you can support the Boston School Bus Union 5:

1. Contact: 

  • Veolia General Manager Alex Roman III: 617-780-4840; alexander.roman@veoliatransdev.com
  • Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino: 617.635.4500, mayor@cityofboston.gov, Fax 617.635.2851
  • and John McDonough, Interim Superintendent of the Boston Public Schools 617-635-9050, superintendent@bostonpublicschools.org, fax 617-635-9059. 

Tell them “Honor the School Bus Drivers Contract! Hand off Local 8751 leaders!”

Send copies to the Committee to Defend the School Bus Union 5  at schoolbus5@teamsolidarity.org

2. Hold a solidarity activity, if possible at a Veolia location near you, or.

Come to Boston and Rally outside Veolia’s corporate offices during the disciplinary hearings against the 5!

 1:30pm – 8pm (Come after work!), Monday, October 28, 35 Freeport Way, Dorchester

3. Send solidarity letters and resolutions to the Committee to Defend the School Bus Union 5 at schoolbus5@teamsolidarity.org

4. Send your endorsement of the Committee to Defend the School Bus Union 5 to schoolbus5@teamsolidarity.org..

5.  Donate to the support fund. (account being set up.. find Team Solidarity on facebook at tinyurl.com/d5tntcg for more info)

misguidedivory:

vampirefinch:

Gonna reblog this every time it crosses my dash.

They dont want us to know

misguidedivory:

vampirefinch:

Gonna reblog this every time it crosses my dash.

They dont want us to know

(Source: totallynotablogger, via socialistxtwerker)

paxamericana:

Rob Brown, star of ‘Treme,’ says he was arrested at Macy’s after buying mom watch

The actor has filed a lawsuit against the retailer, alleging he was ‘paraded’ through the Herald Square location in handcuffs and placed in a holding cell after making a purchase — for no reason other than an employee there was skeptical his credit card was really his. Brown has starred in blockbusters like ‘Finding Forrester,’ ‘Coach Carter,’ and had a role in ‘The Dark Knight Rises’.

paxamericana:

Rob Brown, star of ‘Treme,’ says he was arrested at Macy’s after buying mom watch

The actor has filed a lawsuit against the retailer, alleging he was ‘paraded’ through the Herald Square location in handcuffs and placed in a holding cell after making a purchase — for no reason other than an employee there was skeptical his credit card was really his. Brown has starred in blockbusters like ‘Finding Forrester,’ ‘Coach Carter,’ and had a role in ‘The Dark Knight Rises’.

(via disciplesofmalcolm)

talkingtrashcan:

soambitchous:

paxamericana:

nbclatino:

DISCRIMINATION: Wells Fargo to pay $175 million over lending practices against Latinos and African Americans.
Read More

Reminder that Wells Fargo employees bragged about how they gave “ghetto loans” to “mud people.” 


Nah, racism doesn’t exist anymore, though. Just ignore it and it will go away. Stop talking about it and being sensitive. 
This is an example of what people are saying when they explain racism as something that’s systematic and institutionalized. People feel because people aren’t running around lynching people and calling you nigger (some actually still do, but they say it with a accent or a little slang so it sounds like nigga and you laugh it up) that people are complaining over nothing. Racism has matured in a way that it’s unseen and affects people of color still, every day, making our lives and our pursuit of any kind of respect more difficult. We literally can’t live in peace.
But I’m sleep tho.

UGH GODDAMNITT THIS IS MY BANK UGH FUCK U BANK

talkingtrashcan:

soambitchous:

paxamericana:

nbclatino:

DISCRIMINATION: Wells Fargo to pay $175 million over lending practices against Latinos and African Americans.

Read More

Reminder that Wells Fargo employees bragged about how they gave “ghetto loans” to “mud people.” 

image

Nah, racism doesn’t exist anymore, though. Just ignore it and it will go away. Stop talking about it and being sensitive. 

This is an example of what people are saying when they explain racism as something that’s systematic and institutionalized. People feel because people aren’t running around lynching people and calling you nigger (some actually still do, but they say it with a accent or a little slang so it sounds like nigga and you laugh it up) that people are complaining over nothing. Racism has matured in a way that it’s unseen and affects people of color still, every day, making our lives and our pursuit of any kind of respect more difficult. We literally can’t live in peace.

But I’m sleep tho.

UGH GODDAMNITT THIS IS MY BANK UGH FUCK U BANK

(via disciplesofmalcolm)

dentonsocialists:

Ah, see, this is why we have all the fun.

Where do I sign up?

dentonsocialists:

Ah, see, this is why we have all the fun.

Where do I sign up?

jugendzeit:

Black children play outside The Ida B. Wells homes, one of Chicago’s oldest housing projects. There are 1,652 apartments housing 5,920 persons in 124 buildings on the South Side. Many buildings in this part of the city have been systematically vacated for various reasons. Even though many are salvageable, they are razed And replaced with high rent highrises which have little or no appeal to the area’s previous residents, 05/1973
John H White, US National Archives

jugendzeit:

Black children play outside The Ida B. Wells homes, one of Chicago’s oldest housing projects. There are 1,652 apartments housing 5,920 persons in 124 buildings on the South Side. Many buildings in this part of the city have been systematically vacated for various reasons. Even though many are salvageable, they are razed And replaced with high rent highrises which have little or no appeal to the area’s previous residents, 05/1973

John H White, US National Archives

(Source: Flickr / usnationalarchives, via theblackcommunist)

occupyallstreets:

Whistleblowing Wednesday: Children As Young As Six Harvest 25 Percent of U.S. Crops
Knowing the farmer who grows your food has become an important tenet of the modern food movement, but precious little attention is paid to the people who actually pick the crops or “process” the chickens or fillet the fish. U Roberto Romano’s poignant film, The Harvest/La Cosecha (2011), being screened across the country for Farmworker Awareness Week (March 24-29), informs us that nearly 500,000 children as young as six harvest up to 25 percent of all crops in the United States.
What’s illegal in most countries is permitted here. Child migrant labor has been documented in the 48 contiguous states. Seasonal work originates in the southernmost states in late winter where it is warm and migrates north as the weather changes. Every few weeks as families move, children leave school and friends behind. If you’ve had onions (Texas), cucumbers (Ohio or Michigan), peppers (Tennessee), grapes (California), mushrooms (Pennsylvania), beets (Minnesota), or cherries (Washington), you’ve probably eaten food harvested by children.
This isn’t a slavery issue, or an immigration issue per se. What’s remarkable is that most of the migrant child farmworkers are American citizens trying to help their families. This is a poverty issue and it gets to the heart of what we, as consumers, see as the “right price” to pay for food. 
Children earn about $1,000 per year for working an average of 30 hours a week, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. When you consider that the average annual pay for a migrant family of four is $12,500-$14,500, it’s apparent why some families feel they have no choice but to bring their children into the fields with them. Half of these kids will not graduate from high school because they’re always moving around, perpetuating the cycle of poverty that caused them to be day laborers in the first place.
Read More

occupyallstreets:

Whistleblowing Wednesday: Children As Young As Six Harvest 25 Percent of U.S. Crops

Knowing the farmer who grows your food has become an important tenet of the modern food movement, but precious little attention is paid to the people who actually pick the crops or “process” the chickens or fillet the fish. U Roberto Romano’s poignant film, The Harvest/La Cosecha (2011), being screened across the country for Farmworker Awareness Week (March 24-29), informs us that nearly 500,000 children as young as six harvest up to 25 percent of all crops in the United States.

What’s illegal in most countries is permitted here. Child migrant labor has been documented in the 48 contiguous states. Seasonal work originates in the southernmost states in late winter where it is warm and migrates north as the weather changes. Every few weeks as families move, children leave school and friends behind. If you’ve had onions (Texas), cucumbers (Ohio or Michigan), peppers (Tennessee), grapes (California), mushrooms (Pennsylvania), beets (Minnesota), or cherries (Washington), you’ve probably eaten food harvested by children.

This isn’t a slavery issue, or an immigration issue per se. What’s remarkable is that most of the migrant child farmworkers are American citizens trying to help their families. This is a poverty issue and it gets to the heart of what we, as consumers, see as the “right price” to pay for food.

Children earn about $1,000 per year for working an average of 30 hours a week, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. When you consider that the average annual pay for a migrant family of four is $12,500-$14,500, it’s apparent why some families feel they have no choice but to bring their children into the fields with them. Half of these kids will not graduate from high school because they’re always moving around, perpetuating the cycle of poverty that caused them to be day laborers in the first place.

Read More

(via socialismartnature)